Putting power where it is needed: a motor at each wheel

While traditional architectures deploy a single motor at the heart of the vehicle, there are benefits that come with including a motor on each wheel. Michael Nash investigates

The architecture of electric, connected and autonomous vehicles is constantly evolving. Changes to layout and positioning of components can have an enormous impact on efficiency, the room inside for occupants, and the vehicle’s general functionality and operation. Motors play a vital role, and while traditional architectures have featured a single motor at the heart of the vehicle, several companies are eying up an array of potential benefits that come with including a motor on each wheel.

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