Russia remains a shared mobility success story

Major players are now looking to spread beyond major cities, and then to new markets. By Jacob Moreton

There are few areas where Russia is undeniably a global automotive leader, but shared mobility is one. Largely undented by the COVID-19 pandemic, car-sharing continues to find success in Russia’s major cities. In the nation’s capital, Moscow, the number of vehicles available for shared rides has increased from 100 in 2010 to 25,000 in 2020, rising by a factor of 250, according to a report from the city’s transport department. Riders completed 44 million trips in 2020, the report adds, equal to that of 2019, suggesting that the pandemic has done little to dissuade Muscovites from using shared mobility services.

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