Automakers unlikely to accept AV liability unless fully driverless

Freddie Holmes gauges the legal implications of handing control of the vehicle to a computer

If something goes wrong during a taxi or bus journey, it would be rare for the passengers on board to be held accountable. And rightly so—they are not in control of the vehicle. In future, the idea is that autonomous vehicles will afford the same kind of freedom within the cabin; riders could watch a film, hold a meeting with colleagues or perhaps more likely, scroll social media. That level of trust in the system will only come if two elements are in place.

What are the legal implications of driverless cars?

First, the technology must

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