Report: Vehicles in use – Europe 2019

Containing the latest data, the 2019 edition of ACEA’s ‘Vehicles in use’ report provides an extensive overview of the European motor vehicle fleet

Containing the latest data, the 2019 edition of ACEA’s ‘Vehicles in use’ report provides an extensive overview of the European motor vehicle fleet. Per country, it shows the number of vehicles in use for each segment – covering passenger cars, light commercial vehicles, medium and heavy commercial vehicles, and buses – and how that fleet developed in recent years.

The report, which can be downloaded by clicking here, also provides interesting statistics per vehicle segment for each country, such as the average age (as well as the year of first registration), the fuel type, and the number of vehicles per 1,000 inhabitants.

Key findings

  • The EU passenger car fleet grew by 8% over the last five years, with the number of cars on the road rising from 248 million in 2014 to 268 million in 2018 – see page 3.
  • 33.2 million vans are in circulation throughout the European Union. Counting more than 6.2 million vehicles, France has by far the largest van fleet, followed by Spain (4.6 million), the United Kingdom (4.4 million vans) and Italy (4.2 million) – see page 4.
  • There are 6.6 million trucks on the EU’s roads. With more than 1.1 million trucks, Poland has the largest truck fleet, followed by Germany (946,541) and Italy (904,308) – see page 5.
  • Around 770,000 buses are in operation throughout the European Union, 30% of which is found in two countries alone: Poland and Italy – see page 6.
  • Passenger cars are now on average 10.8 years old in the EU. Estonia, Lithuania and Romania have the oldest fleets, with vehicles older than 16 years. The newest cars can be found in Luxembourg (6.4 years) and the United Kingdom (8.0 years) – see page 9.
  • The average age of light commercial vehicles in the EU is 10.9 years. Aged almost 19 years, Greek vans are the oldest ones – see page 10.
  • Trucks are on average 12.4 years old in the European Union. Among the five major markets, Spain has the oldest fleet (14.4 years), followed closely by Italy (14.0 years) – see page 11.
  • The average age of EU buses is 11.4 years now. The oldest buses can be found in Greece (20.4 years) and the youngest ones in Austria (5.4 years) – see page 12.
  • Please click here to view the full press release.

SOURCE: ACEA

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