Talent shortage poses EV battery manufacturing questions

With more gigafactories opening, ensuring identical cells, modules and packs are built is proving no easy task. By Jack Hunsley

The world’s electric vehicle (EV) car parc is expected to expand substantially this decade. The International Energy Agency (IEA) for instance, projects that a mixture of regulation and consumer interest will see 300 million EVs on the road by 2030. In contrast, the IEA notes that just 130,000 EVs were sold back in 2012. Though success on this front would do wonders for decarbonising transport, it’s a move that will have profound implications throughout the entire EV value chain.

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