Automotive cyber threats largely financially-motivated, for now

Most hackers appear to want monetary pay-outs for their efforts, but increasingly connected and automated vehicles present worrying potential. By Jack Hunsley

Ask any layperson to detail a worst-case scenario in the context of automotive cyber security, and many would likely suggest hackers taking mass control of autonomous vehicles for malicious intent. However, experts in the field are eager to stress that there are numerous scenarios to consider, with both physical and financial attacks on the table.

For instance, a vehicle’s interfaces provide opportunities for compromising personal and financial data, as well as impacting vehicle control systems.

It’s time to log in (or subscribe).

Not a member? Subscribe now and let us help you understand the future of mobility.

Monthly Online Magazine
£195
1 user
12-month subscription (Annual rebill)
Access to Automotive World Magazine, our must-read monthly online publication
Mag + Articles + Special Reports
£495
1 user
12-month subscription (Annual rebill)
Access to Automotive World Magazine plus all articles and more than 40 special reports per year
All Content
Single-User License
£2,250
1 user
12-month subscription (Annual rebill)
Free tickets to Automotive World events
Unlimited online access to all content, including Automotive World magazine, articles, special reports, data and research
All Content
Team License
£3,950
Up to 5 users
12-month subscription (Annual rebill)
Free tickets to Automotive World events
Unlimited online access to all content, including Automotive World magazine, articles, special reports, data and research
All Content
Company-Wide License

Contact us for pricing

Unlimited users
12-month subscription
Free tickets to Automotive World events
Unlimited online access to all content, including Automotive World magazine, articles, special reports, data and research

Welcome back , to continue browsing the site, please click here