Driverless MaaS legislation should be built through collaboration

Understanding the legal environment of driverless MaaS will need continued innovation and cooperation. By Jack Hunsley

Mobility-as-a-service (MaaS) in its current ‘sans autonomy’ form is still very much an emerging concept. It might have come on in great strides across the 2010s, but it is still, from a regulatory perspective at least, very much finding its feet. While this may not relate directly to deploying autonomous MaaS solutions, currently fragmented foundations set the tone for future MaaS legislation.

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