Wireless vehicle charging shows promise, but not a priority for infrastructure rollout

Many applications, particularly autonomous ones, could benefit from inductive charging, but significant share in EV infrastructure may be a mid to long-term development. By Xavier Boucherat

If wireless charging has a bad reputation outside of the industry, it is due in part to devices on the market today for smartphones. More often than not, these are frustratingly slow. The technology is restrained for safety purposes: wireless chargers generate significant heat, and without caps on charging speeds, they risk frying batteries. What’s more, this heat generation means significant amounts of energy are wasted. For smartphone users, the choice at home between plugging in and going wireless is a no-brainer.

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