Lifan 320: Low cost cars in Latin America and the Caribbean still mean “zero star safety”

The Lifan 320 is one of the least safe cars tested by Latin NCAP; it scored zero stars in Adult and Child Occupant protection after being tested in a frontal impact test* at 64 kph. The non-airbag version of this model was purchased in Chile as the most basic equipped version that is offered in …

The Lifan 320 is one of the least safe cars tested by Latin NCAP; it scored zero stars in Adult and Child Occupant protection after being tested in a frontal impact test* at 64 kph.

The non-airbag version of this model was purchased in Chile as the most basic equipped version that is offered in Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC) market. The injuries assessed in the driver’s head and chest led to the zero star safety for the Adult Occupants. The 320’s structure was rated as unstable which added to the detachment of the steering wheel during the crash test give reasons not to expect improvements in Adult occupant safety even with the car equipped with airbags. The 320 also scores zero stars for Child occupant safety. The manufacturer declined to recommend CRS for the test as all other manufacturers do in Latin NCAP, this is penalized with points reduction following the line that manufacturers are responsible for the safety of all passengers in the car. Latin NCAP had to choose the CRS to be used in the test.

Maria Fernanda Rodríguez, Latin NCAP President and Fundación Gonzalo Rodríguez President said:

“I am concerned, making clear that I am aware of the significant progress that some manufacturers are doing in our region in road safety. I express my displeasure at seeing that we still have vehicles with unacceptable results. We need governments to require and control that the vehicles sold in LAC meet the minimum United Nations safety standards. I also reaffirm the importance of making this information available, so any family in LAC at the moment of getting into a car knows what they might face in case of an accident and can decide at the moment of purchasing a vehicle”.

The Chevrolet Onix recently assessed by Latin NCAP in 2014 reached three stars Adult Occupant protection and two stars in Child Occupant protection. This model did not score points for the Seat Belt Reminder (SBR) in the first assessment because it did not meet Latin NCAP’s minimum requirements. Chevrolet decided to update the SBR system in the Onyx for cars produced as from the end of August 2014. The update in the SBR for the driver make the Onyx meet Latin NCAP’s requirements and brings extra 0.5 points to the score of the Adult Occupant protection of the Onix. The score for Adult occupant protection increases now from 10.17 to 10.67 points keeping the three stars for Adult Occupant protection. This demonstrates how manufacturers are positively reacting to Latin NCAP’s results and improve their models.

Alejandro Furas, Latin NCAP Secretary General and Global NCAP Technical Director said: “Unfortunately the Lifan result shows once again that still many low cost models in our region offer zero star safety. The consumers that buy these models are families buying their first new car making a big effort or young drivers as a first car. It is unacceptable for Latin NCAP that they expose consumers to these very low safety levels”.

Close
Close