Germans curious about robo-taxis and largely reject carsharing

The 2018 Continental Mobility Study shows that the vast majority of Germans embrace public transport but snub carsharing and carpooling

The 2018 Continental Mobility Study shows that the vast majority of Germans embrace public transport but snub carsharing and carpooling. While one third of respondents would be prepared to use robo-taxis, the majority remain somewhat skeptical. When it comes to current and future mobility services, opinions in Germany differed significantly in some cases from those in the U.S.A., China and Japan, where people are much more open, particularly about robo-taxis.

For large cities, which are increasingly being stifled by today’s private transport, robo-taxis offer an effective and efficient alternative. They can operate continuously, while private cars are often parked for an average of 23 hours a day. Autonomous robo-taxis can also help people get around enclosed premises such as campuses, amusement parks and shopping malls.

Four out of five Chinese people could imagine using a robo-taxi, along with almost half of respondents in the U.S.A. and Japan. In Germany, city dwellers expressed the most positive attitude toward this concept, with 41 percent willing to consider using driverless taxis. It is striking that, in Germany, all age groups appear less accepting, with no noticeable difference between drivers and non-drivers. Women proved most skeptical, with three quarters saying they would not use a robo-taxi.

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SOURCE: Continental

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