Why are automotive semiconductors so valuable?

For better or worse, semiconductors or ‘chips’ have become central to modern mobility. By Jacob Moreton

The world’s first automobile, built in 1886 by German Carl Benz, was a surprisingly simple affair. Featuring an internal combustion engine and just three wheels, the technology was certainly a leap forward from previous iterations, which had relied on steam power. But at its core, it was a simple device, designed simply to transport passengers.

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