What does Beijing’s battle against air pollution mean for automakers?

Beijing may be big but its vehicle parc is severely restricted. Megan Lampinen takes a closer look at how the city's mobility ecosystem is evolving

China's battle with air pollution has been well documented over the years, so much so that it's become an established stereotype. Acid rain, photochemical smog, and black smoke pouring out of industrial stacks—such images are kept out of the tourist brochures, but they have become firmly associated with the country's urban centres over the years.

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