The solid-state EV battery is taking shape

The much-discussed alternative to liquid electrolyte technology could soon take its first steps into the real world, but benefits will only arrive over time. By Xavier Boucherat

Nio is making increasing noise in the electric vehicle (EV) segment: the recent unveiling of its upcoming ET7 sedan puts it on track to compete directly not just with the Tesla Model S, but also the world’s incumbent premium manufacturers. It could prove a canny move, but along with shining a light on the company’s business plans, the unveil also underlined its technology ambitions. Chief among these was the offer of a 150kWh solid-state battery in vehicles by the end of 2022: the company claims this will enable a range of over 1,000km (621 miles).

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