How graph technology can help map a car’s DNA

Data expert Emil Eifrem makes the case for a fresh approach to understanding the complexity of today's vehicle production

One of the most complex consumer products in existence is the car. After all, even the most humble family runabout contains at least 100 communication buses transmitting information inside the vehicle, as well as 200 control units that regulate no less than 400 functions from acceleration to collision protection, audio control to GPS and seat heating. Plus, there are 2,000 software components and applications that process and exchange around 10,000 signals from all areas of the vehicle.

It’s time to log in (or subscribe).

Not a member? Subscribe now and let us help you understand the future of mobility.

Monthly Online Magazine
£195
1 user
12-month subscription (Annual rebill)
Access to Automotive World Magazine, our must-read monthly online publication
Mag + Articles + Special Reports
£495
1 user
12-month subscription (Annual rebill)
Access to Automotive World Magazine plus all articles and more than 40 special reports per year
All Content
Single-User License
£2,250
1 user
12-month subscription (Annual rebill)
Free tickets to Automotive World events
Unlimited online access to all content, including Automotive World magazine, articles, special reports, data and research
All Content
Team License
£3,950
Up to 5 users
12-month subscription (Annual rebill)
Free tickets to Automotive World events
Unlimited online access to all content, including Automotive World magazine, articles, special reports, data and research
All Content
Company-Wide License

Contact us for pricing

Unlimited users
12-month subscription
Free tickets to Automotive World events
Unlimited online access to all content, including Automotive World magazine, articles, special reports, data and research

Welcome back , to continue browsing the site, please click here