Don’t discount passive safety’s importance for autonomous vehicles

An AV is in theory less likely to crash than a human-driven vehicle, but developers cannot afford to focus solely on active safety tech. By Jack Hunsley

AVs are often marketed as a place where passengers can relax, work and play. Often complete with fully rotating and reclining seats, vast digital screens and state-of-the-art connectivity, the hope is that these future machines will redefine how occupants get from A to B. However, despite the opportunities on offer, it is vital developers do not ignore practical design challenges.

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